Jonah and the Golden Calf

 

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“The Adoration of the Golden Calf,” painting by Nicolas Poussin, 1663-1666.

 

There are many pictures that come to mind when thinking about the biblical book of Jonah: a prophet running from God, a powerful storm on the sea, a giant fish/whale/sea monster, the metropolis of Nineveh, multitudes on their knees crying out in repentance, etc. A golden cow is not typically one of those impressions. Yet the golden calf in the Sinai wilderness would have been perhaps the primary image in Jonah’s mind as he fled to Tarshish. Let me explain. Continue reading

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Tears for Lazarus

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(This poem is based on John 11:35: “Jesus wept,” and explores reasons why the Savior cried at the tomb of Lazarus.)

Why cry for friend laid down on stone
Dead, covered, buried in a tomb
When power to raise does He possess
And restored life with him to bless

Was it for pain of certain knowing
If He had been there for consoling
Sickness would have fled in fear
If only He had lingered near

Was it for hurt to loved ones shown
When Mary and Martha asked Him come
Their words of doubt cut deep inside
“If You had been here, he would not have died.”

Was it for seeing injustice done
The curse of death imposed by sin
A world broken, bleeding, dying
Was this why at his tomb stood crying

Our Savior, Lord of all creation
Whose death would give us entrance to heaven
Whose sacrifice, only, made us alive
Whose love means we will never die

Were they tears of hope and love
That one day the dead will rise above
And join the righteous of all the ages
In singing the praises of the Ancient of Days

Death cannot live within His presence
Life cannot die with Christ ascended
His love is deep and long and wide
Displayed by tears for friend who died

3 Things Mary Knew… Gospel Coalition Article

I’m excited to say I have an article up on the Gospel Coalition website exploring connections between Mary’s song/psalm and the Old Testament Scriptures. You can take a look here:

https://www.thegospelcoalition.org/article/3-things-mary-knew-baby-boy/

I view this as the beginning of a larger study of the first chapters of Luke’s Gospel and the OT connections that are implied. I’d love to hear any thoughts you might have. Merry Christmas!

Christmas Verses – Luke 2:15-20

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When the angels went away from them into heaven, the shepherds said to one another, “Let us go over to Bethlehem and see this thing that has happened, which the Lord has made known to us.” And they went with haste and found Mary and Joseph, and the baby lying in a manger. And when they saw it, they made known the saying that had been told them concerning this child. And all who heard it wondered at what the shepherds told them. But Mary treasured up all these things, pondering them in her heart. And the shepherds returned, glorifying and praising God for all they had heard and seen, as it had been told them. Luke 2:15-20.

The shepherds, upon hearing the announcement of Jesus’ birth, go to visit the baby in the manger. They tell Mary and Joseph what the angels have said. This event served as a sign for Jesus’ parents and all who heard it. Mary in particular wondered at the events, treasuring these things and pondering them in her heart.

The result is the glorying and praising of God by the shepherds. Even in his infancy, Jesus was directing human beings to give their praise and glory to God on high.

Christmas Verses – Luke 2:8-14

And in the same region there were some shepherds staying out in the fields, and keeping watch over their flock by night. And an angel of the Lord suddenly stood before them, and the glory of the Lord shone around them; and they were terribly frightened. And the angel said to them, “Do not be afraid; for behold, I bring you good news of a great joy which shall be for all the people; for today in the city of David there has been born for you a Savior, who is Christ the Lord. And this will be a sign for you: you will find a baby wrapped in cloths, and lying in a manger.” And suddenly there appeared with the angel a multitude of the heavenly host praising God, and saying, “Glory to God in the highest, And on earth peace among men with whom He is pleased.” Luke 2:8-14.

After Jesus is born, shepherds received an angelic announcement of the birth of the Messiah. Why did the Lord send angels to shepherds to announce the birth of the king? It may be a connection to Isaiah 40:11: “Like a shepherd He will tend His flock, in His arm He will gather the lambs, and carry them in His bosom; He will gently lead the nursing ewes.” This verse speaks of the coming of the Lord with might and authority to rule, and is the “good news” proclaimed in v. 9. It may also continue Luke’s themes of the reversal of injustice: shepherds, normally the lowly of society, are the first to hear the blessed news of Messiah’s birth.

The baby born is “a Savior, who is Christ the Lord.” I have previously written about the significance of this verse in showing that Jesus was savior, Messiah, and God all in one. The angels give God praise for the birth of this child. The birth of Jesus means glory to God in the highest heaven, but also peace on earth among human beings, with whom Jesus was pleased to dwell.

Christmas Verses – Luke 2:1-7

Now it came about in those days that a decree went out from Caesar Augustus, that a census be taken of all the inhabited earth. This was the first census taken while Quirinius was governor of Syria. And all were proceeding to register for the census, everyone to his own city. And Joseph also went up from Galilee, from the city of Nazareth, to Judea, to the city of David, which is called Bethlehem, because he was of the house and family of David, in order to register, along with Mary, who was engaged to him, and was with child. And it came about that while they were there, the days were completed for her to give birth. And she gave birth to her first-born son; and she wrapped Him in cloths, and laid Him in a manger, because there was no room for them in the inn. Luke 2:1-7.

Luke records the journey from Nazareth to Bethlehem at the command of Caesar Augustus. Notice how God sovereignly adjusts human history, working in the heart of the Roman Emperor to stir his thinking to demand a census so that Mary and Joseph would return to Bethlehem, thereby fulfilling OT prophecy (Micah 5:2). Notice also that Mary is still said to be engaged to Joseph here. Since the engagement period normally lasted a year, it is reasonable to believe that all of these events from the angel’s appearing to Mary to Jesus’ birth took place very quickly (within a year).

Jesus would have been born not in a palace as he deserved, but lowly in a manger, the place where common domestic animals fed. There was no room for the family in the inn, probably due to the influx of people for the census. Just as there was no room for Jesus’ family in the inn, so there would be no room for Jesus in Pharisaic Jewish society, no room for a king in Israel, no room for a suffering Messiah, and no room for his people as strangers in a foreign land today.

Also, contrary to many Sunday School Christmas pageants, the text does not present this account as though Mary and Joseph arrive in Bethlehem and the same night she gives birth. Luke writes, “and it came about while they were there, the days were completed for her to give birth…” This gives the sense that they needed to remain in Bethlehem for some time for census purposes, and that while they were residing there, she gave birth during that time.

Christmas Verses – Matthew 1:18-25

Now the birth of Jesus Christ was as follows. When His mother Mary had been betrothed to Joseph, before they came together she was found to be with child by the Holy Spirit. And Joseph her husband, being a righteous man, and not wanting to disgrace her, desired to put her away secretly. But when he had considered this, behold, an angel of the Lord appeared to him in a dream, saying, “Joseph, son of David, do not be afraid to take Mary as your wife; for that which has been conceived in her is of the Holy Spirit. And she will bear a Son; and you shall call His name Jesus, for it is He who will save His people from their sins.” Now all this took place that what was spoken by the Lord through the prophet might be fulfilled, saying, “Behold, the virgin shall be with child, and shall bear a Son, and they shall call His name Immanuel,” which translated means, “God with us.” And Joseph arose from his sleep, and did as the angel of the Lord commanded him, and took her as his wife, and kept her a virgin until she gave birth to a Son; and he called His name Jesus. Matthew 1:18-25.

In these verses an angel (Gabriel? we don’t know) appears to Joseph to stop him from divorcing Mary. In doing so, he tells Joseph about the son Mary will bear, and that He would save His people from their sins. Matthew then tells us readers that this fulfills the words of Isaiah 7:14. Jesus is “God with us.” Joseph demonstrates his faith in the Lord in that he gets up and does what the angel commands, taking Mary as his wife.

Jesus is a Savior who delivers His people from their sin. Jesus is Immanuel: God (in the person of the eternal Son) with us.