Tears for Lazarus

300px-'The_Raising_of_Lazarus',_tempera_and_gold_on_panel_by_Duccio_di_Buoninsegna,_1310–11,_Kimbell_Art_Museum

(This poem is based on John 11:35: “Jesus wept,” and explores reasons why the Savior cried at the tomb of Lazarus.)

Why cry for friend laid down on stone
Dead, covered, buried in a tomb
When power to raise does He possess
And restored life with him to bless

Was it for pain of certain knowing
If He had been there for consoling
Sickness would have fled in fear
If only He had lingered near

Was it for hurt to loved ones shown
When Mary and Martha asked Him come
Their words of doubt cut deep inside
“If You had been here, he would not have died.”

Was it for seeing injustice done
The curse of death imposed by sin
A world broken, bleeding, dying
Was this why at his tomb stood crying

Our Savior, Lord of all creation
Whose death would give us entrance to heaven
Whose sacrifice, only, made us alive
Whose love means we will never die

Were they tears of hope and love
That one day the dead will rise above
And join the righteous of all the ages
In singing the praises of the Ancient of Days

Death cannot live within His presence
Life cannot die with Christ ascended
His love is deep and long and wide
Displayed by tears for friend who died

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Why the Garden Tomb is [Probably] Not Jesus’ Tomb

HOLYLAND 2005 111Several years ago I was blessed to be able to visit the Holy Land with a former teacher and friend. Seeing the places where biblical events transpired was a truly life-changing experience. I do, however, remember being perplexed by the presentation of the two different popular locations for the burial place of Jesus. One site is contained within the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. Having grown up in a city with an abundance of Catholic churches and being familiar with the iconography and liturgy that accompanies them I was not impressed by the site. It was dark, dank, and devoid of joy, crowded with weeping pilgrims asking forgiveness, perhaps unsure if Christ would grant their petitions.

There was a great contrast between that first site and the Garden Tomb that we later visited. The Garden Tomb was situated in the midst of beautiful greenery in a quiet and quaint area inviting the meditation and reflection of visitors. There was even a sign on the recently added tomb door that read “He is not here. He has risen.” I will never forget my instructor standing beside me near the Garden Tomb with a smile on his face, saying facetiously, “This place just feels so good, this is where it had to have happened. Jesus had to have risen from the dead here, right?”

He was referring to the fact that in spite of how the two different sites may feel, the Garden Tomb is almost certainly not the place where Jesus was buried. Looks can be deceiving, and the look and feel of these two sites today convince many to trust their emotions rather than the evidence. In the following brief sections I want to outline three reasons why the Garden Tomb is likely not the place where Jesus was buried and rose again. Continue reading

Stop Labeling Him “Doubting Thomas”

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In John’s gospel Thomas is absent from the larger group of disciples when Jesus makes His first appearance to them. As a result of this absence, Thomas does not see Jesus, and when the other disciples tell him what has transpired, he refuses to believe. In our day Thomas has been given the label “doubting” because of his lack of faith that Jesus had really risen from the dead. I would like to suggest that this label is misleading, over-simplistic, and ultimately unhelpful. Thomas has gotten a bad reputation in the church today for his doubt, but what if doubt wasn’t really the problem at all? Continue reading